Cutting down on the car chaos at Christmas

Monday, 03 December 2012

Wonderful as it is, Christmas could bring about worry to some car insurance policyholders. 

You see, the festive season brings with it a lot of family visits, a lot of heading to your parents’ house for a slap-up meal (and perhaps, if you’re lucky, the odd gift), and with all this, a lot of traffic.

“The biggest [travel] disruptions around Christmas and New Year are that everybody goes and visits people and there is lots of traffic on the road,” admitted Garmin’s Anthony Chamarny.

“We sometimes think that there is not [a lot of traffic] because we all sit at home and we're nice and warm at home, opening Christmas presents, but in fact a lot of people will go out, visit their families and go and socialise,” he added.

Should a white Christmas come along,  the commentator added, “big problems” might be seen on the roads.

No one wants to end up in the position that a lot of drivers found themselves in back in 2011.

“Last year there were lots of people stranded, and lots of people very ill-prepared on what they should be doing when they go on long journeys. They weren't taking the necessary precautions or equipment when they actually set off on those journeys," warned Mr Chamarny.

Give yourself your own Christmas present, and stock up on the right items to help with the possibility of festive journey disasters.
 

Christmas car essentials:

♦ Something to eat and drink

♦ A Sat Nav if possible

♦ A blanket

♦ Your mobile

♦ Windscreen fluid

♦ A full petrol tank


“Make sure that the car is fuelled up to get you from your journey and back again,” explained Mr Chamarny. “Don't leave it too late because if you run out and you get stuck on a motorway and it is snowing, you will get cold if you've got no fuel.”

Posted by Noel Masrtin.

Copyright Adfero Ltd.

News Home

Swiftcover and swiftcover.com are both trading names of AXA Insurance UK plc, which is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority